Would you like to pay $ 15,000 for a dog? Lockdown demand for furry friends has driven prices up

Amanda Wilkinson (pictured), from Adelaide Hills Groodles, has been breeding dogs intermittently for the past two decades

Massive demand for pets during the coronavirus lockdown has pushed the prices of some popular dog breeds to staggering levels, with “ groodles ” now reaching up to $ 15,000 each.

The value of dogs is so intense that breeders are introducing additional security measures to prevent theft, and adoption centers have stopped advertising their animals online to deter profit-seeking middlemen from obtaining them. .

Amanda Wilkinson of Adelaide Hills Groodles has been breeding dogs intermittently for two decades and has focused on groodles – a Golden Retriever and Poodle crossbreed – for the past two years.

Amanda Wilkinson (pictured), from Adelaide Hills Groodles, has been breeding dogs intermittently for the past two decades

Ms Wilkinson told Daily Mail Australia she was receiving an average of eight requests per week about her dogs before COVID-19 – and now receives ten times as many.

“ COVID-19 has seen people at home with little to do and taken the right time to bring a puppy into their lives, ” she said.

However, she claimed that this could possibly be the worst time as dogs get used to constant interaction and their withdrawal can cause anxiety, and those who make the decision to have a dog now may not be. not fully understand the race.

Ms Wilkinson said she and her husband Sam had always planned to give their dog Matilda a rest from the breeding during the year.

With 109 people on the waiting list for a litter in May, she had become concerned about the potential emergence of irresponsible owners or people who did not understand the breed.

As a result, Ms. Wilkinson has cut her waiting list and is no longer accepting applications.

Ms Wilkinson (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia she was receiving an average of eight inquiries a week about her dogs before COVID-19 - now she receives 12 a day

Ms Wilkinson (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia she was receiving an average of eight inquiries a week about her dogs before COVID-19 – now she receives 12 a day

Popular dog breeds such as groodles (pictured) sell for up to $ 15,000 amid massive demand for pets during COVID-19 pandemic

Popular dog breeds such as groodles (pictured) sell for up to $ 15,000 amid massive demand for pets during COVID-19 pandemic

She pointed out that people who had already applied had a real interest in owning a groodle.

“The prices of some breeders have gone to the extreme and in all honesty it’s a little embarrassing,” she said.

“Some of us ranchers are still charging pre-COVID prices of $ 3,500 to $ 4,500 when the ‘standard’ price appears to be $ 7,000 to $ 15,000.”

Ms Wilkinson said the couple had never advertised their pets online because of their strong reputation for treating their ‘breeding dogs’ like their pets first and foremost.

She said that she and her husband Sam had growing safety concerns due to the popularity of the breed.

Shirley Moore (pictured), from Bribie Island, QLD, mini fox terrier Lily, 16, died last month - and she's struggled to find a new mate ever since

Shirley Moore (pictured), from Bribie Island, QLD, mini fox terrier Lily, 16, died last month – and she’s struggled to find a new mate ever since

“ There is a lot of greed in the world and the groodles now being a much sought after dog with their prices being something people pay for, theft is more of a concern than ever before, ” said Ms Wilkinson.

“ We take a huge risk of welcoming potential families into our home to see our puppies and meet Murphy and Matilda, so it was an unfortunate thing that we had to have cameras installed inside and outside.

“As our puppies were born and raised with us, we feel safe and secure in their safety, but one can never be too careful.

While breeders were able to take advantage of the growing demand, the situation was different for future owners, as dogs – especially of popular breeds – became scarce.

Shirley Moore, from Bribie Island, Queensland, has been struggling to find a new mate since Lily, her 16-year-old mini-fox terrier, died last month.

Due to the lockdowns, wait lists were extremely long for shelters in areas such as Bribie Island, Dakabin, Morayfield and Caboolture.

Then Australian National K9 Rescue paired the 85-year-old with a four-year-old Tenterfield terrier named Tia (pictured)

Then Australian National K9 Rescue paired the 85-year-old with a four-year-old Tenterfield terrier named Tia (pictured)

Help was at hand for Ms Moore, as the Australian National K9 Rescue matched the 85-year-old with a four-year-old Tenterfield terrier named Tia.

Leanne, from the Australian National K9 Rescue, helped pair Ms Moore with her new dog.

She revealed that the organization was reluctant to advertise dogs online due to the pandemic,

She said the pandemic has created a great demand for companion dogs – but people are using it as a chance to buy adopted dogs and sell them for a profit.

“ There are a lot of people who buy dogs and puppies from rescue organizations and breeders and then sell them, ” she told ABC.

“They don’t even go to the houses they are supposed to have been to.

“ We used word of mouth to find the right homes for the dogs, making sure they ended up in those homes.

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